A Brief History of 9 Trends We Love Today

Fashion trends come and go, and we owe fashion history some serious credibility. It seemed overnight, these styles went from cringeworthy to cool, while in actuality some had been around for centuries. Though some trends might deserve to stay in the past, check out some of the must have looks that everyone wants today that were as popular once upon a time.

Chokers

Chokers have actually been around for thousands of years, worn by ancient civilizations like the Egyptians and Mesopotamians. They were generally made of gold and thought to be protective. They have taken on different meanings over time, worn by the Upper Class during the Enlightenment, and a status for ballerinas in the 19th century, chokers reached peak popularity in the 1920s. The style was revived again in the 90s, in chain velvet and tattoo designs. In the early 2000s they were banished from the fashion scene, but with 90s style resurgence today, it was only a matter of time before chokers became one of the quickest revived trends fashion has seen in awhile. The newest way to wear them is packing on as many as possible, in a variety of styles. With Pearls, lace, velvet, pendants and more…the more the merrier!

Crop Tops

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Thanks to 90’s movies hits like Clueless and pop stars like Britney Spears and Christina Aguilera, crop tops golden age was the nineties. However, they’ve been around longer than that. Midriff baring garments were popular in warmer climate regions of the East, like India. The traditional sari is typically worn with a short top underneath called a choli. This style dates back hundreds of years, and is still paired with saris today. It took several decades to catch on in Western cultures, but during World War 2, material had to be rationed and apparel designers seized the opportunity to create a stylish solution- chopping off the bottom half of a shirt. In the early 2000s they were quickly thrown aside. But now they are the latest fashion craze. They are a fun way to show off your style today and modestly show off some skin.

Bomber Jackets

In World War I, airplanes did not have an enclosed cockpit, so pilots had to wear something that would keep them warm. The U.S. Army established the Aviation Clothing Board in September 1917, distributing heavy-duty leather flight jackets; with high wraparound collars, zipper closures with wind flaps, snug cuffs and waists, and some fringed and lined with fur. In World War 2, the sheepskin flying jacket. They became popular with the public through the 90s as a fashion statement. In the fall of 2016, well known models were seen in this outwear, sparking demand once again for this versatile jacket in updated colors, silhouettes and patterns. No matter a person’s gender, age or class, this jacket can be worn by anyone and look great. This style also influenced the letterman jacket, or varsity jacket, traditionally worn by high school and college students in the United States to represent their school and team pride; as well as to display personal awards earned in athletics, academics or activities.

Fishnets

In textiles, fishnet is hosiery with an open, diamond-shaped knit; it is most often used as a material for stockings. Popular in the 1920s with flappers as hemlines began to rise and the 60s as the idea of overthrowing proper women’s clothing, by the 90s they were a full fledge, mainstream idea. The mesh material appeared on runways as tops, dresses and gloves. The trend went to punk, goth culture before it died down, but is once again considered a major accessory item. Great for layering and adding texture to an outfit, I’m not sure why they’ve ever been considered absurd.

Images courtesy of pinterest

Mom Jeans

mom jeans

Image courtesy of pinterest

Mom Jeans are generally loose fitting and high waist in a light blue color. Designer denim had its genesis in the 1970s, but throughout the ’80s the style shifted toward a tapered leg with a loose top, a “tight-roll” or “peg leg” style. By the early nineties, people were over the tight leg and into a looser fit on the bottom, resulting in a baggy pair of jeans. Eventually low rise jeans took over in the 2000s, then skinny jeans in the last ten years, but according to and article from Live About, Topshop reintroduced the market to “mom jeans” a few years ago and now they are a fashion must. Style lovers rock their denim with chunky platform heels or a pair of booties. Thanks, mom, we’ll keep taking our fashion cues from you!

Pajama/satin dresses

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One of the first garments to transcend sex, being worn by both men and women, were pajamas. The pajamas were first introduced in Britain in the 17th century from India, and by the 20th century were popular lounge attire. Coco Chanel, one of the biggest influences in modern fashion, was often photographed in pajamas, accessorized with her signature pearls and effortless elegance. The slinky attire has reappeared in recent runways as a canvas for many designers to express their creativity and for costumers to comment on the state of society and their position within it.

Experimenting with this trend is best, choose silk or satin material to avoid looking like you just rolled out of bed. Playing with proportions is also a good idea to add more interest to your outfit. A distinct pajama shirt paired with skinny jeans and heels or a belted robe with a co-ord keep the attire current and sophisticated.

Overalls

overalls refinery29

Overalls were originally a protective working garment for men. They became a style choice for children before becoming popular women’s style in the 1960s. They are now considered a high fashion garment, going for as much a $1000 for sale. While they can be styled numerous ways, layered with shirts or sweaters underneath or over, accessorized with scarves and hats and worn with a plethora of different shoes, I’d preferred they stayed in my childhood. I find their counterpart, the denim dress (that was also popular in the 90s) as a chicer, mature alternative.

buzzfeed

(Photos courtesy of Refinery29 & Instyle)

Fanny packs
anna sui manish arora rachel comey

Fanny Packs date back to 15th century France, where they were called chatelaine. This small strap around bag debuted in the United States around 1980, and quickly became a pop culture joke through the 90s. While they never really went away, these tiny practical bags have found themselves made up in many styles and patterns and their functionality has made them all the rage today.

(Styles left to right from Ana Sui, Manish Arora & Rachel Comey)

Sweatpants

One of fashions more notorious and controversial items, sweatpants have a crazy history with fashion. First introduced in 1920 by Emile Camuset of Le Coq Sportive. Comfortable, flexible and worn worldwide as tracksuits, joggers, trackies, these pants are worn for comfort and utility. After a fitness craze in the 1980s, sweatpants came in different materials and styles through the 90s, being largely associated with gyms, hip hop and pop music culture. Returning to their merely functional nature, they reached a lull in fashion, but popularity grew again in 2010 as the demand for fashionable workout gear that was also flattering lead to the rise of yoga pants. Often seen as egregious, they came with extensive dress code regulations in schools, offices and public places. Many think this demand has lead to the current trend of athleisure. Athletic wear incorporated into people’s everyday use is a trend expected to continue growing in the next few years. As you enjoy this trend, remember that some materials, dyes and chemicals used to make it water, grease and stain resistant, can have negative consequences on the environment, so be selective in your choice!

While these style have ducked in and out of the fashion scene, the coolest thing about fashion is you can wear anything you want, whenever you want. Which styles found their way back into your closets? (Or possibly never left?)

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